Tagged George Will

The Worst Possible Inaugural Address, By the Worst Possible President

Donald Trump is now the president of the United States, and on his very first day, with his very first speech, he has managed to redraw the picture of America to which we are used. Before Trump, we were accustomed to an America that engaged the world with confidence and strength. An America willing to trade with the world, understanding that trade is not a zero-sum game. An America that not only honored its alliances, but ensured that its allies would never have any reason to doubt American resolve. An America with problems–because no nation is without problems–but one that…

Why Donald Trump Causes Me to Despair

Dan McLaughlin tells us that we should not despair over the continued potency of the Trump for Dictator President campaign, because there is no way that Donald Trump will actually become the presidential nominee of the Republican party. I agree that Trump will not be the Republican nominee, but there continues to be a case for despair.

Stalin Would Approve

This is what happens to Scott Walker supporters in Wisconsin: The early-morning paramilitary-style raids on citizens’ homes were conducted by law enforcement officers, sometimes wearing bulletproof vests and lugging battering rams, pounding on doors and issuing threats. Spouses were separated as the police seized computers, including those of children still in pajamas. Clothes drawers, including the children’s, were ransacked, cellphones were confiscated and the citizens were told that it would be a crime to tell anyone of the raids. Some raids were precursors of, others were parts of, the nastiest episode of this unlovely political season, an episode that has occurred…

Why I Think Highly of Paul Ryan

And why you should too: To take the measure of this uncommonly interesting public man, begin with two related facts about him. Paul Ryan has at least 67 cousins in his Wisconsin hometown of Janesville , where there are six Ryan households within eight blocks of his home. And in his new book, “The Way Forward: Renewing the American Idea,” he says something few politicians say, which is why so many are neither trusted nor respected. Ryan says he was wrong. At a Wisconsin 4-H fair in 2012, Ryan encountered a Democrat who objected to what then was one of…

Neel Kashkari for Governor of California

George Will discusses Kashkari’s appeal, which might well prove to be considerable, given the politics of the state of California. The state would do well to elect a governor who has more than a passing amount of experience with the private sector, of course; hasn’t California had enough of career politicians like Jerry Brown, who have barely (if ever) worked outside of the political/governmental sphere? And to be sure, Will is right to identify Kashkari as representative of a new brand of Republicanism. If there is anything that the past few years have taught us, it is that the GOP…

Quote of the Day

All modern presidents of both parties have been too much with us. Talking incessantly, they have put politics unhealthily at the center of America’s consciousness. Promising promiscuously, they have exaggerated government’s proper scope and actual competence, making the public perpetually disappointed and surly. Inflating executive power, they have severed it from constitutional constraints. So, sensible voters might embrace someone who announced his 2016 candidacy this way: “I am ambling — running suggests unseemly ardor — for president. It is axiomatic that anyone who nowadays will do what is necessary in order to become president thereby reveals character traits, including delusions of adequacy and…

Of Enforced Unionization and First Amendment Violations

An excellent editorial on the subject by George Will. There is no cognizable state interest whatsoever in forcing public sector workers into unions, and the only reason that this is happening–as Will points out–is that the power of unions has been dramatically diminished. I recognize that this upsets unions–and the Democratic party–but their discomfort is not a sufficient reason to force public sector workers to join unions. The Supreme Court should find as much, and I expect that they will.

George Will Urges Us to Read Ilya Somin

A good idea: It was naughty of Winston Churchill to say, if he really did, that “the best argument against democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter.” Nevertheless, many voters’ paucity of information about politics and government, although arguably rational, raises awkward questions about concepts central to democratic theory, including consent, representation, public opinion, electoral mandates and officials’ accountability. In “Democracy and Political Ignorance: Why Smaller Government is Smarter” (Stanford University Press), Ilya Somin of George Mason University law school argues that an individual’s ignorance of public affairs is rational because the likelihood of his or her vote being decisive…