Halbig and the Failure of Port Side Wannabe Wonks

Sean Davis shows that when it comes to covering the Halbig case and its aftermath, the allegedly wonky bloggers and pundits on the port side of the partisan/ideological divide are not exactly setting any records when it comes to doing their jobs properly. As Davis points out, the pundits and bloggers in question have a strange propensity for …

Jonathan Gruber Accidentally Tells the Truth

One of the chief criticisms of those who did not like the Halbig decision is that Congress could not possibly have intended to restrict federal subsidies for coverage under Obamacare to only those states that established an exchange. Furthermore, by not taking intent into account, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals was creating "an 'absurd' result." It is …

Halbig v. Burwell Was Not an “Absurd” Result

Ilya Somin explains why: In its recent controversial decision in Halbig v. Burwell, the US Court of appeals for the DC Circuit ruled that people purchasing health insurance under the Affordable Care Act are only eligible for federal tax credits if they do so through an exchange established by a state. Although the plain text …

Peter Suderman on the Halbig Case

Earlier coverage of the Halbig case here. As Suderman points out, the challenge to the federal subsidies was entirely plausible and legitimate, and as a bonus, yet another court found that the Obama administration was in the process of breaking the law. As referenced in my earlier post, I know that there are people who …

D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals: Federal Health Care Subsidies are Illegal

The text of the Affordable Care Act informs us--as Peter Suderman points out--that the ability to dole out subsidies are limited to "Exchange established by the State." It should therefore surprise precisely no one to find out that federal subsidies for Obamacare--subsidies which are not organized through "Exchange established by the State"--are illegal according to …