On the Confederate Flag

In the wake of the absolutely horrific shooting in South Carolina that left nine people dead, attention has swiftly turned to the display of the Confederate flag in the state, given that the murderer, Dylann Roof, was pictured wrapped in the flag, and given the (to put matters mildly) problematic history behind the flag. As …

May Day and Historical Obliviousness

Yesterday was May Day, the day when people around the world who benefit from the effects of capitalism in ways too numerous to mention, spend one day denouncing capitalism and arguing for policies that will lead to the immiseration of billions if implemented. When I write about "historical obliviousness" in the title of this post, …

A Proper May Day Remembrance

When you read this, remember that excuses like "oh, but communism/Marxism wasn't properly applied/implemented in this case" just don't cut it. No matter how one tries to apply/implement communism/Marxism, things like the following just keep happening somehow: After graduating from college, Müller was for years harassed by the Romanian secret police, the infamous Securitate. When …

In Memoriam: Pete Seeger

His legacy was summed up nicely nearly seven years ago by Ronald Radosh: Today, Jim Brown's new documentary, "Pete Seeger: The Power of Song," opens the annual American Film Institute/Discovery Channel Silverdocs Festival near Washington, D.C. Two years ago, Mr. Brown asked to interview me for the film. I was a former student and friend …

“Libertarians Are the New Communists”?

I think not. Far more accurate to say that Nick Hanauer and Eric Liu are the new Joseph McCarthy: Hanauer and Liu's mode of argument consists of repeating negative statements ("Radical libertarians would be great at destroying," they are "fanatically rigid," they are "economic royalists" who are "mirror images" of communists, etc.) and writing opponents out …

Jean-Paul Sartre: Apologist for Tyranny

Good Sartre jokes aside, his reputation deserves to take a serious hit:. . . starting in the mid-1940s, and increasingly over the next 10 years, Sartre begins to worship at another altar: the altar of Communism. This is an ideology that has notoriously little use for individual freedom; instead of human beings freely making themselves, it sees them …