From May, 2015

It’s Time Once More to Pay Poetic Homage to the Chicago Blackhawks

A little under two years ago, the ghost of Edgar Allen Poe visited me, and demanded that I write a poem in honor of the Chicago Blackhawks, who had just won the Stanley Cup against the Boston Bruins. I was happy to oblige. The Blackhawks have not yet won the Cup this year, but they have earned the right to play for it with a stirring seventh game victory over the Anaheim Mighty Ducks. In honor of my beloved hockey team, and in advance of the series they are going to play against the Tampa Bay Lightweights Lightning for the…

For the Love of All that Is Holy, Stop Claiming that China Will Supplant America as a Superpower. It Won’t. No, Seriously, It Won’t.

Our punditry class and our media in general are filled to the gills with incredibly lazy people who are far more content to recycle stories and analysis than they are to put forth anything resembling original thought and commentary. That’s in part why certain strains of thought that utterly lack any serious intellectual content and are no better than your run-of-the-mill urban myth still get accepted as written-into-stone facts by the public at large. The punditry class and the media in general fail to lift a collective finger in order to demolish myths and half-truths; it’s less taxing for the brain…

Another Reason to Despise the Anti-Vaccination Movement

Would you like to be vaccinated against Lyme Disease? Sure you would; why would anyone want to put up with the complications that might arise from having a Lyme tick bite you–complications that “can lead to arthritis, neurologic problems like meningitis or nerve inflammation, and sometimes even heart problems”? Yes, a vaccine against Lyme Disease would be wonderful. But there is a snag, you see: You can’t get a vaccine against Lyme Disease, because the anti-vaccination movement won’t let you have one:

How Martin O’Malley Can Beat–or at Least Weaken–Hillary Clinton

Let’s make something clear: I don’t think that Martin O’Malley–who has officially jumped into the race for the Democratic presidential nomination–will be his party’s standard bearer in the 2016 presidential election, much less get elected as the 45th president of the United States. But I don’t discount for a moment his ability to weaken the very overhyped Hillary Clinton, whose candidacy is a house of cards, if ever there was one. Joe Battenfeld has some good pointers for O’Malley, pointers that–if followed–can help expose the hollowness of Clinton’s campaign:

Quote of the Day

At 9:30 a.m. on a sunny weekday, the phones at Candelia, a purveyor of sleek office furniture in Lille, France, rang steadily with orders from customers across the country and from Switzerland and Germany. A photocopier clacked rhythmically while more than a dozen workers processed sales, dealt with suppliers and arranged for desks and chairs to be shipped. Sabine de Buyzer, working in the accounting department, leaned into her computer and scanned a row of numbers. Candelia was doing well. Its revenue that week was outpacing expenses, even counting taxes and salaries. “We have to be profitable,” Ms. de Buyzer…

Quote of the Day

Set aside some utopian conception of what marriage is or should be about in the ideal, and instead recognize the way we live now — how and why we marry and how children are brought into this world and the homes in which they are raised. There are hundreds of thousands of children alive today who stand to benefit from being raised in more-stable, two-parent households. Every state allows gay people to raise children — and nearly all allow homosexuals to adopt or serve as foster parents. If this is acceptable (and few would argue that it’s worse for a…

New Blog: The Grumbling Hive

Yes, I am going to continue to blog here. But I also want to create what I hope will become something of a vibrant magazine/salon, which is why I have started up The Grumbling Hive. I may cross-post some pieces here over there as well, in addition to writing pieces solely for The Grumbling Hive, so be sure to check often. As I write in the inaugural post, I can’t guarantee that every submission will be accepted, but I certainly hope to get some submissions and if I do, I will give them every consideration.

Sometimes, Politicians Need to Be Political

Kevin Williamson is being quite unfair to Robert Gates in his editorial piece. Sometimes, an argument from organizational self-interest is the best argument to carry the day on a particular issue, and failing to argue from a standpoint of organizational self-interest means losing the argument on that issue. There are doubtless a significant number of people in the Boy Scouts who would prefer to keep the current ban against gay troop leaders, and no amount of moral suasion is going to change the minds of those people. Equally doubtless: Those who remain opposed to changing the rules banning gay troop leaders…

Semi-Good News on Trade Policy

I am pleased to see that the Trans-Pacific Partnership Act has gotten a boost from the United States Senate with the Senate’s decision to grant President Obama fast-track authority to negotiate a new trade deal. I wish that I could say that the vote was unanimous, but alas, it wasn’t, thanks mainly to protectionist Democrats who want America’s trade policies to be as antediluvian as humanly possible. Protectionist Democrats may get another shot at undermining American trade policy by opposing fast-track in the House of Representatives. The question is whether House Republicans will join in this effort to sabotage the…

Paul Krugman Is Fundamentally Dishonest (A Continuing Series)

Any just and intellectually defensible analysis of the New York Times’s decision to hire Paul Krugman as a columnist has to conclude that in making the hire, the Times severely harmed its own credibility. Krugman simply cannot be trusted to present facts and make honest arguments. Behold the latest example of Krugman’s thoroughgoing mendacity. Comes now the part of any Krugman-related post in which I remind people of what Daniel Okrent, the onetime New York Times ombudsman wrote upon giving up his onetime post: Paul Krugman “has the disturbing habit of shaping, slicing and selectively citing numbers in a fashion…