Seattle’s City Council Fails Its Constituents

I don’t know what possessed Seattle’s city council to side with the taxicab cartel instead of siding with the residents of the city, but I do know that the move is utterly unjustified, goes against the interests of the residents of the city, and makes a mockery of free market competition. I can only hope that the city’s mayor will veto this awful legislation, but regardless of what happens, there are a whole bunch of politicians who need to be put out of work once the next citywide election rolls around.

Oh, and this is reprehensible:

There is also some controversy surrounding the process of how the vote came to light. Under the city council’s General Rules and Procedures, it’s required to provide fair notice of its agenda at least two business days prior to a vote, according to Uber.

The council waited until last Friday, however, to provide a full version of the regulations which will be voted on. And that version included several provisions that were not in earlier drafts. Furthermore, the new amendments to the bill changed the program from a temporary pilot program to a permanent regulatory scheme.

When an entrenched cartel has to resort to this brand of skulduggery in order to win a vote, you know that there is something truly distasteful going on.

(Related coverage here.)