Obamacare Is Not Getting Any More Popular

Although people like Nancy Pelosi assure us that Democrats will be able to run and win on Obamacare, the truth out on the campaign trail appears to belie her claims:

In 2010, Democrats ignored the slew of attacks on the health care law only to lose more than 60 seats – and their majority – in the House and six seats in the Senate. Now they’re switching strategies, casting themselves as crusaders out to repair a broken law.

They call the law “imperfect” and “flawed.” They air television ads that highlight the need to “fix Obamacare.” They criticize President Barack Obama for the “disastrous” rollout of the website, healthcare.gov, and for breaking a promise to Americans that they could keep their health insurance if they liked it. Many defy the White House and support Republican proposals to change the law.

“I would not have thought it would still be an issue. But now I think this will be an issue through the campaign,” said Brian Nestande, a state legislator and one of the Republicans vying to challenge Rep. Raul Ruiz, the Democrat seeking a second term.

Yes, it’s a long time until Election Day. Yes, attitudes may change. But despite claims that the website and the implementation of Obamacare are supposedly better, the issue remains politically deadly for Democrats. At least for the moment, Republicans can be excused for feeling giddy.