We Passed the Health Care Bill, and We Are Finding Out What’s In It

I just wish that we would find out about some good news. Alas, there is no good news today:

Healthy consumers could see insurance rates double or even triple when they look for individual coverage under the federal health law later this year, while the premiums paid by sicker people are set to become more affordable, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis of coverage to be sold on the law’s new exchanges.

The exchanges, the centerpiece of President Barack Obama’s health-care law, look likely to offer few if any of the cut-rate policies that healthy people can now buy, according to the Journal’s analysis. At the same time, the top prices look to be within reach for many people who previously faced sky-high premiums because of chronic illnesses or who couldn’t buy insurance at all.

[. . .]

A review of rates proposed by carriers in eight states shows the likely boundaries for the least-expensive and most costly plans on the exchanges. The lower boundary is particularly important because the government wants to attract healthy people to the exchanges, and they may choose to pay a penalty and take the risk of going without coverage if they believe they can’t get an acceptable deal.

For a 40-year-old single nonsmoker—in the middle of the age range eligible for exchanges—a “bronze” plan covering about 60% of medical costs will be available for about $200 a month in most places, the proposals show.

[. . .]

The challenge for the law is that healthy 40-year-olds can typically get coverage for less today, especially if they are willing to accept fewer benefits or take on more costs themselves. Supporters of the law say tighter regulation on insurance practices gives consumers more protection and is worth the extra cost, but they have to persuade people who don’t have an immediate need for health care of that. If only sick people buy into the new insurance pools, prices could shoot up.

Get ready to pay more for health care in a day and age in which individuals and families have to cut costs as much as possible because of job insecurity, lessened work hours, and plain old unemployment. It’s not going to be a fun time.